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    Medicare for All Would Save US $5.1 Trillion Over Ten Years

     

    We can always dream....

    The Hill...

    Seventy percent of Americans support 'Medicare for all' in new poll
    By Megan Keller - 08/23/18 11:16 AM EDT

    A vast majority — 70 percent — of Americans in a new poll supports "Medicare for all," also known as a single-payer health-care system. The Reuters–Ipsos survey found 85 percent of Democrats said they support the policy along with 52 percent of Republicans.

     

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    Friday, November 30, 2018 | Common Dreams

    'Easy to Pay for Something That Costs Less': New Study Shows Medicare for All Would Save US $5.1 Trillion Over Ten Years

    "Medicare for All promises a system that is fairer, more efficient, and vastly less expensive than America's bloated, monopolized, over-priced and under-performing private health insurance system."

    "Medicare for All promises a system that is fairer, more efficient, and vastly less expensive than America's bloated, monopolized, over-priced and under-performing private health insurance system," argued Columbia University professor Jeffrey Sachs. (Photo: Will Allen / @willallenphoto)

    BURLINGTON, VT - Confronting the question most commonly asked of the growing number of Americans who support replacing America's uniquely inefficient and immoral for-profit healthcare system with Medicare for All—"How do we pay for it?"—a new paper released Friday by researchers at the Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) shows that financing a single-payer system would actually be quite simple, given that it would cost significantly less than the status quo.

    "We really can get more and pay less."
    —Michael Lighty

    "It's easy to pay for something that costs less," Robert Pollin, economics professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and lead author of the new analysis, declared during a panel discussion at The Sanders Institute Gathering in Burlingon, Vermont, where Pollin unveiled the paper for the first time.

    According to the 200-page analysis of Sen. Bernie Sanders' (I-Vt.) Medicare for All Act of 2017, the researchers found that "based on 2017 U.S. healthcare expenditure figures, the cumulative savings for the first decade operating under Medicare for All would be $5.1 trillion, equal to 2.1 percent of cumulative GDP, without accounting for broader macroeconomic benefits such as increased productivity, greater income equality, and net job creation through lower operating costs for small- and medium-sized businesses."

    The most significant sources of savings from Medicare for All, the researchers found, would come in the areas of pharmaceutical drug costs and administration.

    In a statement, Pollin said his research makes abundantly clear that the moral imperative of guaranteeing decent healthcare for all does not at all conflict with the goal of providing cost-effective care.

    "The most fundamental goals of Medicare for All are to significantly improve healthcare outcomes for everyone living in the United States while also establishing effective cost controls throughout the healthcare system," Pollin said. "These two purposes are both achievable."

    "Medicare for All promises a system that is fairer, more efficient, and vastly less expensive than America's bloated, monopolized, over-priced and under-performing private health insurance system."
    —Jeffrey Sachs, Columbia University

    As Michael Lighty, a Sanders Institute fellow and former director of public policy for National Nurses United, put it during the Gathering on Friday, "We really can get more and pay less."

    The official roll-out of PERI's analysis came on the heels of a panel discussion of the moral urgency of Medicare for All, particularly during a time when tens of millions of Americans are uninsured, life expectancy is declining, and thousands of families are bankrupted by soaring medical costs each year.

    Far from being an unaffordable "pipe dream," Columbia University professor Jeffrey Sachs—who introduced the panel at The Sanders Institute Gathering on Friday—argued that the PERI study shows Medicare for All "offers a proven and wholly workable way forward."

    "Medicare for All promises a system that is fairer, more efficient, and vastly less expensive than America's bloated, monopolized, over-priced and under-performing private health insurance system," Sachs said. "America spends far more on healthcare and gets far less for its money than any other high-income country."

     

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    ~OGD~

    Comments

    FWIW I see Politico is currently reporting this:

    Establishment (Dems) looks to crush liberals on Medicare for All

    The coalition that fought Obamacare repeal has fragmented as the party tries to follow through on campaign promises.

    12/10/2018 05:10 AM EST


    It seems unlikely to me that the democrats are going to get into a knock down drag out fight over something that is at most symbolic. No matter what the house might pass on health care it will go nowhere in the senate.


    I caught this a month ago...

    The Dems most likely won't get into the Medicare for All, but...

    Health Care was a major issue in the election.

    From Charles Gaba at ACA Signups.net Mon, 11/12/2018: "Starting in January, the House Democrats will be able to vote on and pass pretty much whatever bills they want, presumably under the leadership of Nancy Pelosi as Speaker of the House. Via Robert Pear of the NY Times: The top priorities for Ms. Pelosi, the House Democratic leader, and her party’s new House majority include stabilizing the Affordable Care Act marketplace, controlling prescription drug prices and investigating Trump administration actions that undermine the health care law. ...House Democrats plan to hold early votes on proposals to protect people with pre-existing medical conditions, an issue they continually emphasized in midterm races.

    acasignups.net/18/11/12/house-democrats-plan-move-swiftly-protect-aca-day-one

    Pre-election poll from Kaiser Family Foundation.


     

     

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    ~OGD~


    This is the smart thing to start with

    House Democrats plan to hold early votes on proposals to protect people with pre-existing medical conditions, an issue they continually emphasized in midterm races.

    I saw more than a few polls and articles that convinced me that this caused many to get up off the couch and vote.

    As to all the rest, I was just checking exit polls, and truth be told, it looks pretty mixed. Despite all the polls one can cite saying the general citizenry likes the sound of "Medicare for all", the voters in 2018, don't necessarily fall for it. Here's a short summary from this Forbes link

    Health care Forty-one percent of voters said health care was the most important issue facing the country, followed by immigration (23%), the economy (22%), and gun policy (10%). These four issues ranked in the same positions in the AP VoteCast survey. Fifty-seven percent in the exit poll said the Democrats would better protect health care for people with pre-existing conditions, while 35% said the GOP would. Sixty-nine percent said the health care system needed major changes. In the AP VoteCast survey, 25% of voters wanted to repeal the Affordable Care Act, 27% repeal some parts of it, 13% leave the law as it is, and 34% expand it. 

    I would suspect from that: every change beyond protecting pre-existing will end up being contentious. Because those politically active about health care don't fall for simplistic nostrums. And when they challenge or support a change, the general public will get more educated about it. A reminder that Medicare itself has always been a third rail: tough to make changes, reps don't want to touch it because they get immediate kickback from voters. Every step of the way is a fight and takes some gumption and a lot of work convincing people.

    All that said, major changes gotta come because: providers are like fed up to hell and not going to take it anymore. As more and more boomers see the mess as they access, up close and personal, they'll see that.

    Last but certainly not least: The fate of Buffett, Bezos and Dimon experiment under Dr. Gawande is an important one. What they do could change the current landscape even before lawmakers do much at all.


    Now the numbers...

    Secular Talk Published on Dec 11, 2018

    Medicare for All advocates just received an early holiday present: a new study from the Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst finds that single-payer health care will save the US $5.1 trillion over a decade while drastically cutting working-class Americans’ health spending. It’s the most robust, comprehensive study yet produced on Medicare for All, which has long been in need of easily citable research...

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    ~OGD~

     


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